Study of Squid Fishing Operation (Squid Jigging) and the Role of Parachute Anchors in Argentina Water and the Falkland Islands-UK in FV. Agnes 107

  • Rahmat Muallim Jakarta Technical University of Fisheries, Jl. AUP – Pasar Minggu, Jakarta Selatan, Indonesia
  • Robet Perangin-angin Karawang Marine and Fisheries Polytechnic, Jl. Lingkar Tanjungpura, Karangpawitan, Karawang, Indonesia
  • Muhamad Siswan Efandi Jakarta Technical University of Fisheries, Jl. AUP – Pasar Minggu, Jakarta Selatan, Indonesia
Keywords: Fisheries management, sustainability of fisheries, Capture fisheries resources

Abstract

Falkland Island is an England area whose largest income comes from fisheries: the export of squid. Squid brings important economic value and occupies the third number in fisheries after fish and shrimp. The squid fishing line's operation consists of automatic fishing machines, roll, yudei, fishing line, swivel, and ballast. The fishing line for squid has operated automatically. The influence of waves and currents influence the fishing line to not operate properly. Meanwhile, a parachute anchor is a tool that maintains the balance of the ship and fishing line. The operation system of the parachute anchor is to restrain the movement of currents underwater. The mainline and float line connected to a hydraulic machine at the bow of the ship. The main rope sizes are 50 m, 60 m, 70 m, 80 m, and 90 m. In calm water or wind speeds of less than 10 km per hour, the size of the mainline used is 50 m, and if the wave is big or the wind speed is more than 35 km per hour, the size used is 90 m. The application of the right size keeps the boat and fishing line in balance. The number of catches during one trip is 119,970 kg, with the lowest catch occurred in January, amounting to 1,710 kg, and the largest catch occurred in March, amounting to 82,530 kg. Types of the catch divided into 2: squid with 20 kg and 10 kg. For 20 kg size, mostly obtained in March with a total catch of 2M = 33,040 kg and for the size of 10 kg with a total catch of a size of Y is 23,510 kg.

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Published
2021-01-08
Section
Articles